Muse Stories Season 5: The Unusual Histories of San Diego's People, Places and Things

 

If you love weird history mixed with archaeological findings and some entertaining stories, then Melanie & Karen have a podcast for you!

New podcasts are posted the 2nd Tuesday of every month on all podcast outlets, with occasional hilarious accompanying video blogs on our YouTube channel! Check them out and don't forget to subscribe! Also, please leave a review on iTunes.

Muse Stories is written and produced by Melanie Dellas and Karen Lacy, directed and edited by Jessica Crossman.

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Season 5, Episode 2

From the Water to the Walls

For many people in the world, the belief in paranormal activity is a very normal thing. From hauntings to possessions and everything in between, it seems as though death isn’t always the end. No matter where you live, you can find a house, building, park or something that has a ghost story attached to it. From haunted homes to spooky ships, there are a plethora of locations where many of the deceased call home – even if they didn’t die there. But why? Let’s look at the theories behind the ghostly activity that makes some locations a playground for the paranormal. 

Music from freemusicarchive.org: Watercool Quiet by Blue Dot Sessions; Lunette by Blue Dot Sessions; I Leaned My Back Against an Oak (after the Water is Wide) by Axletree. Sound Effects from freesound.org: Pirate Ship at Bay by CGEffex; Eerie Tone Sloooow by Adam_N; Waves lapping on rocks by dan.pugsley.

Season 5, Episode 1

The Madam and the Marbles

One of the most iconic buildings in San Diego’s Gaslamp District with the most sordid history is the Louis Bank of Commerce. Located on the 800 block of 5th Avenue, the beautiful building with two towers is touted as the jewel of the Gaslamp by locals and historians of the area. Built in 1888, the bottom floor served as a bank, then later a restaurant that Wyatt Earp frequented; and the upper floors, consisting of 33 rooms, were rented out by Madam Cora, a fortune teller who must have foreseen a higher profit margin in a house of ill repute. Thus, the Golden Poppy Hotel was born, as well as the site of our story, The Madam and the Marbles. Click on the social media links above for pictures, interviews and more!